Name origins of Utah counties. Click Read more for full list.

jwbt123:

Red Counties (Native American):

Tooele County - It is speculated that the name derives from a Native American chief, but controversy exists about whether such chief lived.

Wasatch County - Ute Indian word for mountain pass or low place in the high mountains.

Uintah County - Portion of the Ute Indian tribe that lived in the basin.

Juab County - Native American word for thirsty valley, or possibly only valley.

Sanpete County - Ute word saimpitsi, meaning “people of the tules”

Piute County - Named after the Piute tribe.


Blue Counties (Animal or plant)

Box Elder County - Named after the Box Elder tree

Beaver County - Named after… well… Beavers.


Green Counties (Named directly after a member of the LDS Church)

Rich County - It was named for an early LDS apostle, Charles C. Rich.

Morgan County - The county was named for Jedediah Morgan Grant, father of Heber J. Grant, who served as president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Davis County - The county was named for Daniel C. Davis, captain in the Mormon Battalion.


Brown Counties (Named after Spanish Word)

Utah County - Named after the Spanish word for the Ute tribe, Yuta.


Yellow Counties (Historical Event or Person)

Cache County - The county was named for the fur stashes made by many of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company trappers.

Weber County - Named for John Henry Weber (1779–1859), a fur trapper and trader in the area in the mid-1820s.

Daggett County - The county was named for Ellsworth Daggett, the first surveyor-general of Utah.

Millard County - It was named for Millard Fillmore, thirteenth President of the United States.

Emery County - The county was named for George W. Emery, governor of the Utah Territory in 1875

Wayne County - The county was formed from Piute County in 1892, and gets its name from Wayne County, Tennessee

Garfield County - It was named for James A. Garfield, late President of the United States, who had been assassinated in 1881.

Kane County - The county was named for Col. Thomas L. Kane, a friend of the Mormon settlers.

Washington County - Named after George Washington


Purple Counties (Natural, non-animal or plant, feature)

Salt Lake County - Named after the Great Salt Lake

Summit County - Named because it has 39 of the highest peaks in Utah.

Carbon County - Named because of coal deposits in the area.

Grand County - Named after the Grand River, which was later named the Colorado River.

San Juan County - Named after the San Juan River. Now, the reason this is not put under the brown counties, is because it was named because of the river, not because of the name of the River.

Sevier County - Named after the Sevier River

Iron County - Named because of the Iron Mines west of Cedar City


Black Counties (Disputed)

Duchesne County - No one is sure about the exact origin of the naming. Seven possible origins:

  1. The Ute Indian word doo-shane meaning dark canyon.

  2. Fort Duquesne, built by the French in what is now Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

  3. Rose du Chesne, founder of the Sacred Heart in St. Louis, MO.

  4. An early Indian chief in the region.

  5. An 1830s French fur trapper.

  6. André Duchesne, a French geographer and historian

  7. Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, is about 200 miles northwest of Nauvoo, Illinois and sixty miles south of the Black River, which led to the LDS Church’s 1840s lumber mills on the Mississippi river.

September 2, 2014


Map Of North Carolina split into 10 sections with a population of approx. 1,000,000 people each

Blocked_ID:

Base Map: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_North_Carolina_location_map.svg

Data Source: US Census 2013 Population Estimates http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/maps/north_carolina_map.html

I compiled the data by hand, (by adding together the populations of adjacent counties) and created the map using InkScape.

September 1, 2014
Medieval Map
September 1, 2014


What if Oregon Territory re-united?

SounderBruce:

This is Oregon Territory, during a five-year period shortly after the signing of the Oregon Treaty (extending the Canadian border to the Pacific Ocean on the 46th parallel) from 1848 to 1853.

There’s been various proposals to unite with BC as a country called Cascadia, including /r/cascadia. There’s already a national soccer (football) team, so it is to be taken seriously.

I took the liberty of excluding the parts of Montana and Wyoming west of the Continental Divide for the sake of simplicity. This was originally going to be a map of the entire Oregon Country, from the tip of Alaska to the Californian border, but combining statistics and rankings from two different countries (with different measurement systems) was too much work for a quick Reddit post.

August 31, 2014


futurejournalismproject:

Mapping Perspective

Via Al Jazeera:

Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm…

…There is nothing inevitable or intrinsically correct — not in geographic, cartographic or even philosophical terms — about the north being represented as up, because up on a map is a human construction, not a natural one. Some of the very earliest Egyptian maps show the south as up, presumably equating the Nile’s northward flow with the force of gravity. And there was a long stretch in the medieval era when most European maps were drawn with the east on the top. If there was any doubt about this move’s religious significance, they eliminated it with their maps’ pious illustrations, whether of Adam and Eve or Christ enthroned. In the same period, Arab map makers often drew maps with the south facing up, possibly because this was how the Chinese did it.

Things changed with the age of exploration. Like the Renaissance, this era didn’t start in Northern Europe. It began in the Mediterranean, somewhere between Europe and the Arab world. In the 14th and 15th centuries, increasingly precise navigational maps of the Mediterranean Sea and its many ports called Portolan charts appeared. They were designed for use by mariners navigating the sea’s trade routes with the help of a recently adopted technology, the compass. These maps had no real up or down — pictures and words faced in all sorts of directions, generally pointing inward from the edge of the map — but they all included a compass rose with north clearly distinguished from the other directions.

Image: A perfectly good map. Select to embiggen.

August 31, 2014


If the First French Empire reunited

SwarlDelae:

Following the recent trend, what if the First French Empire united. Data from the CIA World Factbook. Map from Wikimedia Commons. Background Painting from François Gérard.

The First French Empire was the empire of Napoléon I of France. It lasted from 1804 to 1815, when it collapsed following France’s first dire lost battles at the hand of Russia, England, and what was basically the first signs of the unification of Germany. Here is the wikipedia article.

And yes, for some of those data, those are weighted averages, not plain averages. Comparisons are made with the United States of America and China. Because let’s be honest, you can’t really use Russia as a gauge anymore.

Known errors on this map :

  • male litteracy is 99,53%, should be 99.53%
  • while some isles of Greece were part of the First French Empire, I chose not to include them here because they’re only 1 or 2% of total Greece.
  • aaaand I forgot cities. Biggest is Paris (11,175,000 inhabitants), then Dortmund (5,376,000), Madrid (5,263,000), Milano (4,136,000), Barcelona (4,082,000), Berlin (4,016,000), Rome (3,190,000), Düsseldorf (3,073,000), Köln (3,070,000) and Katowice (3,029,000).
August 31, 2014


If the First French Empire reunited

SwarlDelae:

Following the recent trend, what if the First French Empire united. Data from the CIA World Factbook. Map from Wikimedia Commons. Background Painting from François Gérard.

The First French Empire was the empire of Napoléon I of France. It lasted from 1804 to 1815, when it collapsed following France’s first dire lost battles at the hand of Russia, England, and what was basically the first signs of the unification of Germany. Here is the wikipedia article.

And yes, for some of those data, those are weighted averages, not plain averages. Comparisons are made with the United States of America and China. Because let’s be honest, you can’t really use Russia as a gauge anymore.

Known errors on this map :

  • male litteracy is 99,53%, should be 99.53%
  • while some isles of Greece were part of the First French Empire, I chose not to include them here because they’re only 1 or 2% of total Greece.
  • aaaand I forgot cities. Biggest is Paris (11,175,000 inhabitants), then Dortmund (5,376,000), Madrid (5,263,000), Milano (4,136,000), Barcelona (4,082,000), Berlin (4,016,000), Rome (3,190,000), Düsseldorf (3,073,000), Köln (3,070,000) and Katowice (3,029,000).
August 31, 2014
Science Graphic of the Week: Where We Should and Shouldn’t Build Roads in the Future
August 30, 2014
Watch how Louisiana's coastline has vanished over the last 80 years
August 30, 2014


vizual-statistix:

I have previously defended Portland’s weather. The point I made was that, while it absolutely rains more often (more days per year) in Portland than most other large cities, we get less rain overall (in terms of depth of water). These maps visualize the latter point using average precipitation from 30-yr normals (1981-2010). Note that almost half of Portland’s precipitation occurs in November-January, but the combined precipitation in July and August is less than 4% of the annual total. To emphasize this seasonality, I’ve also mapped normals for July and December, when Portland is drier and wetter, respectively, than most of the country.

Data source: http://www.prism.oregonstate.edu/normals/

August 30, 2014


Great Flood of the Mississippi River, 1993

During the first half of 1993, the U.S. Midwest experienced unusually heavy rains. Much of the United States in the upper reaches of the Mississippi River drainage basin received more than 1.5 times their average rainfall in the first six months of the year, and parts of North Dakota, Iowa, and Kansas experienced more than double. The rains often arrived in very intense storms. Floods overwhelmed the elaborate system of dykes and other water control structures in the Mississippi River basin, leading to the greatest flood ever recorded on the Upper Mississippi. In St. Louis, the Mississippi remained above flood stage for 144 days between April 1 and September 30, 1993.

This image pair shows the area around St. Louis, Missouri, in August 1991 and 1993. The 1993 image was captured slightly after the peak water levels in this part of the Mississippi River. Flood waters had started to recede, but remained well above normal. This false-color image was created by combining infrared, near infrared, and green wavelengths of light observed by the Thematic Mapper (TM) instrument onboard the Landsat 5 satellite (TM bands 5, 4, and 2 respectively). Water appears dark blue, healthy vegetation is green, bare fields and freshly exposed soil are pink, and concrete is grey. The scale of flooding in the river basins of the Illinois, Missouri, and Mississippi Rivers in 1993 is immense. The deep pink scars in the 1993 image show where flood waters have drawn back to reveal the scoured land.

Other factors contributed to the severity of the flooding that year. The previous year had been cooler than average, which decreased evaporation from the soil and allowed the heavy rains to saturate the ground rapidly. In addition, widespread landcover change along rivers and streams has dramatically altered the natural flood control systems: wetlands that can absorb large amounts of water and release it slowly over time. The network of levees, canals, and dams in the Upper Mississippi Basin was unable to control the floods of 1993.

Spurred by this massive disaster, geologist Robert Brackenridge of Dartmouth College brought the tools of satellite remote sensing to bear on the issue of flood management, prediction, and monitoring. You can read about his work in the feature article High Water: Building A Global Flood Atlas.

NASA images created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using data provided courtesy of the Landsat Project Science Office.

Instrument(s): Landsat 5 - TM
August 30, 2014
August 30, 2014


Russian Empire in 1866

August 30, 2014
love this
August 30, 2014
Lovely ...
August 30, 2014
August 30, 2014

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